ASPS Plastic Surgery Latest News






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The latest news from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons

Fat Grafting Shows Promise for Cancer Patients With Radiation-Induced Skin Injury https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/fat-grafting-shows-promise-for-cancer-patients-with-radiation-induced-skin-injury
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<p>As cancer survival rates improve, more people are living with the aftereffects of cancer treatment. For some patients, these issues include chronic radiation-induced skin injury – which can lead to potentially severe cosmetic and functional problems.</p>
<p>Recent studies suggest a promising new approach in these cases, using fat grafting procedures to unleash the healing and regenerative power of the body’s natural adipose stem cells (ASCs). “Preliminary evidence suggests that fat grafting can make skin feel and look healthier, restore lost soft tissue volume and help alleviate pain and fibrosis in patients with radiation-induced skin injury after cancer treatment,” says J. Peter Rubin, MD, MBA, FACS, <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/”>American Society of Plastic Surgeons</a> (ASPS) President-Elect and Chair of the Department of Plastic Surgery at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He’s one of the authors of a new review of the clinical evidence on fat grafting for radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury.</p>
<p>”But while promising, available research has some key weaknesses that make it difficult for us to determine the true benefits of fat grafting right now,” Dr. Rubin adds. The review appears in the April issue of <a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”><em>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</em></a>®, the official medical journal of the ASPS.</p>
<p>More than half of patients diagnosed with cancer receive radiation therapy. Because skin cells turn over rapidly, they are exquisitely sensitive to the damaging effects of radiation. In the first few months after treatment, many patients develop acute radiation injury, with skin inflammation, peeling, swelling, pain and itching. In most cases, symptoms resolve over time. However, if inflammation continues, radiation-induced skin injury can become a chronic problem, leading to tight, stiff skin (fibrosis) with a risk of poor wound healing, ulcers and tissue loss.</p>
<p>Fat grafting procedures – transferring the patient’s own fat cells from one part of the body to another – have become widely used in many cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery procedures. In their review, Dr. Rubin and colleagues round up promising research on fat grafting for patients with radiation-induced skin injury.</p>
<p>In studies of breast cancer patients, fat grafting procedures have reduced pain and other symptoms of radiation-induced skin injury – backed up by more-normal cellular appearance of skin cells under the microscope. In other studies, fat grafting has led to reduced risks and better outcomes of breast reconstruction after mastectomy.</p>
<p>For patients with radiation-induced skin injury after treatment for head and neck cancer, fat grafting has led to improvements in voice, breathing, swallowing and movement. Good outcomes have also been reported in patients with radiation-induced skin injury in the area around the eye or in the limbs.</p>
<p>”The good news is, fat grafting has the potential to really help patients with discomfort and disability caused by radiation-induced skin damage,” according to Dr. Rubin. While research is ongoing, the benefits of fat grafting seem to result from the wide-ranging effects of ASCs – including anti-scarring, antioxidant, immune-modulating, regenerative and other actions.</p>
<p>”However,” he adds, “the available evidence has a lot of shortcomings, including small sample sizes, lower-quality research designs and a lack of comparison groups.” Variations in fat cell collection and processing, as well as the timing and “dose” of fat grafting, make it difficult to compare results between studies. There are also unanswered questions regarding potential risks related to ASC injection and concerns that fat grafting might affect cancer follow-up.</p>
<p>The reviewers outline some steps for further research to clarify the benefits of fat grafting for radiation-induced skin and soft issue injury, including approaches to clinical assessment and imaging studies, testing of skin biomechanics and circulation and cellular-level analyses. For all of these outcomes, standardized measures are needed to achieve more comparable results between studies.</p>
<p>”We hope our review will inform efforts to establish the benefits of specific types of fat grafting procedures in specific groups of patients,” says Dr. Rubin. “To do that, we’ll need studies including larger numbers of patients, adequate control groups and consistent use of objective outcome measures.”</p>
<p><em><a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</a></em>® is published by <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/”>Wolters Kluwer</a>.</p>
<p><a href=”https://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/Fulltext/2021/04000/Fat_Grafting_in_Radiation_Induced_Soft_Tissue.8.aspx” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Click here</a> to read “Fat Grafting in Radiation-Induced Soft-Tissue Injury: A Narrative Review of the Clinical Evidence and Implications for Future Studies”</p>
<p><small>Article: “Fat Grafting in Radiation-Induced Soft-Tissue Injury: A Narrative Review of the Clinical Evidence and Implications for Future Studies” (doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000007705)</small></p>
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About Wolters Kluwer
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<p><a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>Wolters Kluwer</a>&nbsp;(WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit <a href=”https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health” title=”Wolters Kluwer Health” target=”_blank”>https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health</a> and follow us on <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a> and Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>@WKHealth</a>.</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>www.wolterskluwer.com</a>, follow us&nbsp; on&nbsp;<a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>Twitter</a>, <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/wolterskluwer” target=”_blank”>Facebook</a>, <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a>, and <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/user/WoltersKluwerComms” target=”_blank”>YouTube</a>.</p>

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How Fat Loss Accelerates Facial Aging https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/how-fat-loss-accelerates-facial-aging
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<p>For many of us, as we get older the skin on our face begins to sag and we seem to lose volume around our eyes, cheeks and chin. Is gravity taking its toll in our later years? Or do we lose fat over the course of several years that many of us associate with youth, vibrancy and energy?</p>
<p>Understanding the cause is paramount to how plastic surgeons treat the signs of facial aging.</p>
<p>The traditional theory is sagging: the facial soft tissues simply yield to the effects of gravity over time. And while the idea that weakening ligaments in the midface could result in soft tissue descent still has merit, more recent studies point in another direction. Perhaps the real culprit behind facial aging is the loss of fat – both near the surface of the skin and in deeper areas.</p>
<p>In a new study featured in the February issue of <a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”><em>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</em></a>®, the official medical journal of the <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/”>American Society of Plastic Surgeons</a> (ASPS), Aaron Morgan, MD, of the Medical College of Wisconsin and his colleagues studied 19 patients who underwent computed tomography (CT) scans of the head on two occasions at least a decade apart. Although the patients weren’t undergoing <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/cosmetic-procedures/facelift”>facelift surgery</a> or any other cosmetic procedure, scans proved useful for measuring changes in fat deposits in the midface – the area between the eyes and mouth – over time. The patients averaged about 46 years at the time of their initial scan and 57 years at follow-up.</p>
<p>While the findings varied among patients, the results showed “definite and measurable loss of midface fat volume.” The total volume of facial fat decreased from about 46.50 cc (cubic centimeters) at the initial scan to 40.8 cc at the follow-up scan: a reduction of about 12.2 percent.</p>
<p>However, the amount of reduction wasn’t the same at all levels. Fat volume in the superficial compartment, just under the skin, decreased by an average of 11.3 percent. That compared to an average 18.4 percent reduction in the deep facial fat compartment.</p>
<p>The findings provide direct evidence to support the “volume loss” theory of facial aging – and may help in understanding some of the specific issues that lead patients to seek facial rejuvenation. “In particular, we think that deep facial fat loss removes support from the overlying fat,” Dr. Morgan explains. “That causes deepening of the nasolabial fold, which runs from the nose to the mouth. Meanwhile, fat loss closer to the surface makes the cheeks appear deflated.”</p>
<p>Variations in fat volume loss can also explain aging-related hollowing around the eyes and heaviness of the jowls. “The upper face has less fat to begin with, so fat loss is more apparent,” said Dr. Morgan. “In contrast, the cheek or buccal area has relatively little fat loss, so that area appears fuller as changes occur in other areas of the midface.”</p>
<p>This study could help plastic surgeons identify techniques to replace or reposition the midface fat in a more “physiologic” way. “We think that our findings will help plastic surgeons design more natural approaches to facial rejuvenation, with the aim of re-creating the facial fat distribution of youth,” said Dr. Morgan. “This proves there is volume depletion and not just laxity of tissues with aging. So, volume replacement should be used in addition to surgical procedures to attempt to recreate the youthful face.”</p>
<p><em><a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</a></em>® is published by <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/”>Wolters Kluwer</a>.</p>
<p><a href=”https://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/Fulltext/2021/02000/Facial_Aging__A_Quantitative_Analysis_of_Midface.10.aspx” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Click here</a> to read “Facial Aging: A Quantitative Analysis of Midface Volume Changes over 11 Years”</p>
<p><small>Article: “Platelet-Rich Plasma: Evolving Role in Plastic Surgery” (doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000007518)</small></p>
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<h2>
About Wolters Kluwer
</h2>

<p><a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>Wolters Kluwer</a>&nbsp;(WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit <a href=”https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health” title=”Wolters Kluwer Health” target=”_blank”>https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health</a> and follow us on <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a> and Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>@WKHealth</a>.</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>www.wolterskluwer.com</a>, follow us&nbsp; on&nbsp;<a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>Twitter</a>, <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/wolterskluwer” target=”_blank”>Facebook</a>, <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a>, and <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/user/WoltersKluwerComms” target=”_blank”>YouTube</a>.</p>

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Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery—Global Open Announces Jeffrey Janis, MD as Editor-in-Chief https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/plastic-and-reconstructive-surgery-global-open-announces-jeffrey-janis-md-as-editor-in-chief
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<p><em>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery—Global Open </em>(PRS Global Open), the official open access, peer reviewed, international medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, has announced Jeffrey Janis, MD, as editor-in-chief.</p>
<p>Since its inception in 2013, the open-access journal quickly established a name for itself. It is indexed in PubMed Central as well as the Web of Science’s Emerging Sources Citation Index and listed in the prestigious Directory of Open Access Journals.</p>
<p>”<a href=”https://journals.lww.com/prsgo/pages/default.aspx” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”><em>PRS Global Open</em></a> is really the Society’s ambassador to the world,” Dr. Janis says. “It has the advantage of knowing no financial barriers to the readership. Through the open-access model, literally anybody around the globe with an internet connection – not just plastic surgeons – can have access to the best available evidence in plastic surgery research, and I want to ensure that ASPS continues to deliver and expand upon the high-quality education for which we’re known. This is our pathway to reaching billions of people.”</p>
<p>Dr. Janis, who is a full-time faculty member at The Ohio State University (OSU) Wexner Medical Center as a professor in the De­partment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, with adjunct appointments as a professor in the Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology and Surgery, and chief of Plastic Surgery at University Hospital was selected as the new editor-in-chief of <em>PRS Global Open</em> after an exhaustive year-long search.</p>
<p>In addition to serving as ASPS president in 2018, Dr. Janis has published over 170 peer-reviewed manuscripts (resulting in 8,300 citations, h-index 46), 104 book chapters and six textbooks – with three additional books and three apps pending publication. He has served as a visiting professor at 44 major national and international institutions and has delivered more than 920 lectures. He is also editor of <em>Essentials of Plastic Surgery</em>, the handbook of plastic surgery used by students, residents, Fellows and surgeons worldwide.</p>
<p>Dr. Janis is a Past President of the American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons and the Columbus Medical Association, and he currently serves as the President of the Migraine Surgery Society, President-Elect of the Americas Hernia Society and as a Governor on the Board of Governors for the American College of Surgeons. He is also a member of the ACGME’s Plastic Surgery Residency Review Committee.</p>
<p>”In the traditional model of journal publication, by the time you write and submit an article and it goes through the workflow process, it could be months to a year before that text ever sees the light of day,” he says. “<em>PRS Global Open</em> has always been great about turning things around in about six weeks. It is in a unique position to be on the cutting edge of plastic surgery research.”</p>
<p>”The vision is to leverage and emphasize the speed and quality of <em>PRS Global Open</em> with acknowledgement and gratitude for the work that’s been done to date, but with a strong eye on the future,” he says. “Everything will be in alignment with the goals of ASPS in terms of inclusivity and representation, and I’m excited to see how we can build upon the solid foundation <em>PRS Global Open</em> has already established.”</p>
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<h2>
About Wolters Kluwer
</h2>

<p><a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>Wolters Kluwer</a>&nbsp;(WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit <a href=”https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health” title=”Wolters Kluwer Health” target=”_blank”>https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health</a> and follow us on <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a> and Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>@WKHealth</a>.</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>www.wolterskluwer.com</a>, follow us&nbsp; on&nbsp;<a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>Twitter</a>, <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/wolterskluwer” target=”_blank”>Facebook</a>, <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a>, and <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/user/WoltersKluwerComms” target=”_blank”>YouTube</a>.</p>

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