ASPS Plastic Surgery Latest News






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The latest news from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons

American Society of Plastic Surgeons Announces Partnership with MedTech Innovator, Industry’s Top Startup Accelerator https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/american-society-of-plastic-surgeons-announces-partnership-with-medtech-innovator-industrys-top-startup-accelerator
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<p><strong>ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, IL –</strong> The <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/”>American Society of Plastic Surgeons</a> (ASPS), the world’s largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons, today announced a new partnership with <a href=”https://medtechinnovator.org/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>MedTech Innovator</a>, the largest accelerator of medical devices in the world. MedTech Innovator matches healthcare industry leaders with innovative medical technology startups for mentorship and support. In 2022, MedTech Innovator will select 50 medical technology startups to participate in its annual Accelerator and Showcase cohort. Under the new partnership with ASPS, three companies will participate in a plastic surgery-focused track. Up to $500,000 in cash prizes plus in-kind awards will be available to this year’s accelerator companies.</p>
<p>ASPS will work directly with MedTech Innovator to mentor and foster the growth of promising early- to mid-stage companies selected for the 2022.</p>
<p>”Innovation is the driving force of plastic surgery, and ASPS is excited to partner with MedTech Innovator to continue to foster new advances in the specialty,” said ASPS President J. Peter Rubin, MD, MBA. “We look forward to providing customized support to the entrepreneurs selected to participate in the program’s 2022 cohort in our shared goal of improving the lives of patients. Plastic surgeons are focused on improving our patients’ quality of life, and ASPS is eager to help accelerate the development of transformative technologies that will further expand the field of plastic surgery.”</p>
<p>”MedTech Innovator offers a vast and supportive network of industry-leading partners that help us provide unparalleled resources and guidance to the most innovative startups in medical technology,” said Paul Grand, CEO of MedTech Innovator. “We are thrilled to partner with ASPS to advance the next generation of plastic surgery-focused medical technologies with the goal of improving the lives of patients.”</p>
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About ASPS
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<p>The <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/”>American Society of Plastic Surgeons</a> (ASPS) is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. Representing more than 7,000 physician members, the society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 93 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.</p>

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About MedTech Innovator
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<p>Based in Los Angeles, Calif., MedTech Innovator is the largest accelerator of medical device companies in the world and the premier nonprofit startup accelerator in the medical technology industry.<sup>[i]</sup> Its mission is to improve the lives of patients by accelerating the growth of companies that are transforming the healthcare system. MedTech Innovator matches healthcare industry leaders with innovative early-stage and emerging growth medtech companies for mentorship and support.</p>
<p>For more information about MedTech Innovator and how to apply for the 2022 Accelerator and Showcase programs, visit <a href=”https://medtechinnovator.org/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>https://medtechinnovator.org/</a> and follow <a href=”https://twitter.com/MedTechAwards” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>@MedTechAwards</a> on Twitter and on <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/medtech-innovator/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>LinkedIn</a>. To receive industry insights and highlights about MedTech Innovator’s current and alumni participant companies, <a href=”https://medtechinnovator.us13.list-manage.com/subscribe/post?u=86ffe5e65cc305bfb5e452948&amp;id=8b227fe600″ target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>subscribe to its monthly newsletter</a>.</p>
<p><small>[i] Gibbs, M., Johnson, B., Silva, B. A., &amp; Berube, K. (2020, July 10). Q2 2020 Life Science Accelerators Insights Cipher Bio. Retrieved September 15, 2020, from https://www.cipherbio.com/blog/life-science-accelerators-insights/</small></p>

</div> Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 webmaster@plasticsurgery.org
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J. Peter Rubin, MD, MBA, FACS, Elected President of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/j-peter-rubin-md-mba-facs-elected-president-of-the-american-society-of-plastic-surgeons
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<p><strong>ATLANTA, GA –</strong> The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), the world’s largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons, named J. Peter Rubin, MD, MBA, FACS, as its new president. Dr. Rubin took office in Atlanta at Plastic Surgery The Meeting, the Society’s annual scientific meeting, on Monday, Nov. 1, 2021 and will serve for one year.</p>
<p>”It’s truly an honor to lead the world’s largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons at a pivotal time in the history of organized medicine,” Dr. Rubin said. “Throughout history, plastic surgeons have evolved as innovators in medicine. That inventive spirit continues – combined with a strong mission of service and contribution – and is applied to finding solutions that improve patient care across the United States and around the globe.”</p>
<p>Dr. Rubin is chair of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Department of Plastic Surgery and the UPMC Endowed Professor of Plastic Surgery, as well as being a professor of bioengineering and director of UPMC wound healing services. He has been a faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh since 2002.</p>
<p>Before being elected president, Dr. Rubin served as the ASPS Vice President of Finance and Treasurer. He is past president of the International Federation for Adipose Therapeutics and Science, for which Dr. Rubin led an international group of scientists worldwide in studying of the use of fat stem cells for treating numerous disorders. He served as chair of the Plastic Surgery Research Council, as well as chair of a joint-society task force on the use of stem cells and co-chair of a multi-society task force on safety in gluteal fat grafting. He is a member of several domestic and internationals medical societies, including serving on the International Society of Plastic Regenerative Surgeons Board of Directors.</p>
<p>Dr. Rubin published a textbook on plastic surgery after weight loss and is lead editor of a multi-author textbook project on body contouring surgery. He has published extensively in the medical literature and received several awards for his research, notably the Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering for his National Institutes of Health-funded work with fat-derived stem cells.</p>
<p>After earning his undergraduate degree in biology from Grinnell College, Dr. Rubin earned his medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine. He completed a categorical residency training program in general surgery at Boston University/Boston City Hospital. He took time away from the clinic to pursue a two-year fellowship in surgical basic science at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. After graduating from general surgery residency, he completed a three-year residency in plastic surgery at Harvard Medical School. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons.</p>
Mon, 01 Nov 2021 22:01:00 +0000 webmaster@plasticsurgery.org
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The Plastic Surgery Foundation Elects Bernard T. Lee, MD, MBA, MPH, FACS, as President https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/the-plastic-surgery-foundation-elects-bernard-t-lee-md-mba-mph-facs-as-president
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<p><strong>ATLANTA, GA –</strong> The Plastic Surgery Foundation (The PSF), which supports the research and international activities of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), named Bernard T. Lee, MD, MBA, MPH, FACS, as its new president. Dr. Lee took office in Atlanta at Plastic Surgery The Meeting, the Society’s annual scientific meeting, and will serve for one year.</p>
<p>”It’s an incredible honor to be leading The PSF as it continues to gain strength not only in advancing scientific research for plastic surgeons – and the medical community at large – but also as we grow our international footprint,” Dr. Lee said. “I look forward to building on the incredible momentum that’s already been established.”</p>
<p>The PSF awarded more than $1 million in grants and scholarships with support from members, other plastic surgery specialty societies and industry partnerships in 2021, and Dr. Lee says he aims to continue expanding The Foundation’s ability to finance plastic surgery-specific research.</p>
<p>Dr. Lee is the Chief of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Vice Chair of Finance in the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) Department of Surgery. He is also professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Lee’s research has long focused on near infrared imaging technologies to identify perfusion characteristics of flaps in reconstructive microsurgery with funding from the National Institutes of Health. He also leads a research team examining outcomes and patient satisfaction after breast cancer and reconstructive surgery. His recent research has focused on health literacy and patient communication in collaboration with faculty at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.</p>
<p>Prior to being elected president of The PSF, Dr. Lee served as ASPS/PSF Vice President of Academic Affairs. He has served on multiple ASPS committees and is also an active member of numerous domestic and international medical organizations, including serving as a director of the American Board of Plastic Surgery and president of the New England Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons. In addition to authoring over 250 peer-reviewed publications, he is editor-in-chief of the <em>Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery</em>, and an editor on a two-volume textbook on reconstructive surgery, <em>Encyclopedia of Flaps</em>. As a previous PSF Visiting Professor, Dr. Lee is a renowned speaker who has been invited to present at conferences around the world.</p>
<p>Dr. Lee earned his medical degree at Tufts University School of Medicine, a master of business administration from University of Massachusetts Amherst – Isenberg School of Management and a master of public health from Harvard. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a Maliniac Fellow of The PSF.</p>
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Did Your Plastic Surgeon Really Turn Back the Clock by 10 Years? Artificial Intelligence May Be Able to Quantify How Young You Actually Look https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/did-your-plastic-surgeon-really-turn-back-the-clock-by-10-years-artificial-intelligence-may-be-able-to-quantify-how-young-you-actually-look
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<p>For most patients, the reasons for having a facelift are simple: to “turn back the clock” for a younger and more attractive appearance. Even during the pandemic year 2020, more than 234,000 patients underwent facelift surgery, according to <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/”>American Society of Plastic Surgeons</a> (ASPS) statistics.</p>
<p>When considering <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/cosmetic-procedures/facelift”>facelift surgery</a>, patients may ask, “How much younger will I look?” For plastic surgeons, that has been a difficult question to answer. Typically, the cosmetic outcomes of facelifting have been judged on a case-by-case basis, or with the use of subjective ratings.</p>
<p>Now research suggests a new, objective approach to assessing the reduction in apparent age after facelift surgery: artificial intelligence (AI) networks trained to estimate age based on facial photos. “Our study shows that currently available AI algorithms can recognize the success of facelifting, and even put a number on the reduction in years of perceived age,” comments senior author James P. Bradley, MD, Vice Chairman of Surgery, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell. The study is published in the July issue of <a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”><em>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</em></a>®, the official medical journal of the ASPS.</p>
<p>The study used a type of AI algorithm called convolutional neural networks. “By training on datasets containing millions of public images, these neural networks can learn to discern facial features with much higher ‘experience’ than a typical person,” Dr. Bradley explains.</p>
<p>Four different, publicly available neural networks were used to make objective age estimates of facial age for 50 patients who underwent facelifting. The AI estimates were made using standardized photos taken before and at least one year after facelift surgery. The results were compared with patients’ subjective ratings of their appearance, along with responses to a standard patient-rated evaluation (FACE-Q questionnaire).</p>
<p>The patients were all women, average age 58.7 years. The AI algorithms used in the study were 100 percent accurate in identifying the patients’ age, based on “before” photos.</p>
<p>In the “after” photos, the neural networks recognized a 4.3-year reduction in age after facelift surgery. That was substantially less than the 6.7-year reduction, as rated by patients themselves. “Patients may tend to overestimate how much younger they look after facelift surgery – perhaps reflecting their emotional and financial investment in the procedure,” Dr. Bradley comments.</p>
<p>On the FACE-Q questionnaire, patients were highly satisfied with the results of their facelift surgery: average scores (on a 0-to-100 scale) were 75 for facial appearance and over 80 for quality of life. Neural network estimates of age reduction were directly correlated with patient satisfaction. “The younger the AI program perceives a patient’s age, the greater their satisfaction with the results of their facelift,” says Dr. Bradley.</p>
<p>Artificial intelligence algorithms can provide an objective and reliable estimate of the apparent reduction in age after facelift surgery, the new findings suggest. These age estimates also seem to provide an indicator of patient satisfaction scores – even if the reduction in years doesn’t quite match the patient’s own subjective rating.</p>
<p>”Together with powerful image analysis tools used in modern plastic surgery, neural networks may play a useful role in counseling patients and demonstrating successful results of facial rejuvenation procedures,” Dr. Bradley adds. “We think that AI algorithms could also play a useful role for plastic surgeons in assessing their own results and comparing the outcomes of different techniques.”</p>
<p><em><a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</a></em>® is published by <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/”>Wolters Kluwer</a>.</p>
<p><a href=”https://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/Fulltext/2021/07000/Turning_Back_the_Clock__Artificial_Intelligence.8.aspx” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Click here</a> to read “Turning Back the Clock: Artificial Intelligence Recognition of Age Reduction after Face-Lift Surgery Correlates with Patient Satisfaction”</p>
<p><small>Article: “Turning Back the Clock: Artificial Intelligence Recognition of Age Reduction after Face-Lift Surgery Correlates with Patient Satisfaction” (doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000008020)</small></p>
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About Wolters Kluwer
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<p><a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Wolters Kluwer</a> (WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students in effective decision-making and outcomes across healthcare. We support clinical effectiveness, learning and research, clinical surveillance and compliance, as well as data solutions. For more information about our solutions, visit <a href=”https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health</a> and follow us on <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/wolters-kluwer/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>LinkedIn</a> and Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>@WKHealth</a>.</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>www.wolterskluwer.com</a>, follow us on <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Twitter</a>, <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/wolterskluwer” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Facebook</a>, <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/wolters-kluwer/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>LinkedIn</a> and <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/user/WoltersKluwerComms” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>YouTube</a>.</p>

</div> Wed, 30 Jun 2021 22:00:00 +0000 webmaster@plasticsurgery.org
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Checking Out Plastic Surgeons on Instagram? You May Need to Check Your Bias Too https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/checking-out-plastic-surgeons-on-instagram-you-may-need-to-check-your-bias-too
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<p>Social media sites – especially Instagram – have revolutionized the way plastic surgeons market their practice. These platforms allow surgeons to post testimonials, educational videos, and before-and-after photos. This information can help to guide patients in making decisions about whether to undergo cosmetic surgery and which plastic surgeon to choose, based on factors like the surgeon’s experience and results achieved.</p>
<p>However, patient perceptions of plastic surgeons’ skills may also be affected by implicit bias – based solely on the ethnicity of the surgeon’s name. “In our survey of responses to otherwise-identical Instagram posts, the plastic surgeon’s name significantly affected perceptions of surgeon competence,” comments lead author Ash Patel, MB, ChB, of Albany (N.Y.) Medical Center.</p>
<p>”The findings remind us that implicit bias plays a critical role in our day-to-day actions, whether or not we realize it,” Dr. Patel adds. The study appears in the June issue of <a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”><em>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</em></a>®, the official medical journal of the <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/”>American Society of Plastic Surgeons</a> (ASPS).</p>
<p>The researchers created a set of mock Instagram posts showing before-and-after photos of a <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/cosmetic-procedures/breast-augmentation”>breast augmentation</a> patient. The posts were identical in every way – except for the plastic surgeon’s name. Versions of the post used female or male names typical of eight different racial/ethnic groups: African, Caucasian or Jewish American, East or South Asian, Black, Latinx, and Middle Eastern.</p>
<p>Online survey participants were presented with one of the mock Instagram posts and asked to rate their perceptions of the plastic surgeon’s competence and how likely they would be to let the surgeon operate on them (recruitment likelihood). The analysis included ratings from nearly 3,000 respondents.</p>
<p>Overall ratings of the surgeons’ competence were similar for names representing different racial ethnic groups. However, there were some significant differences related to the respondents’ racial/ethnic group.</p>
<p>Caucasian Americans and Latinxs were the only two ethnic groups to show in-group favoritism,” Dr. Patel comments. “That may be especially important, as these two ethnicities comprise about 80 percent of cosmetic surgery patients in the United States.”</p>
<p>Surgeons with female names received higher ratings of perceived competence and higher recruitment likelihood scores. Yet female respondents assigned lower recruitment likelihood scores, for both male and female surgeons.</p>
<p>Social media has generated intense interest in cosmetic plastic surgery – with high stakes for plastic surgeons seeking to market their practice online. The new study is the first to examine the effects of implicit bias in social media related to plastic surgery.</p>
<p>Overall, the survey finds that the plastic surgeon’s apparent gender and ethnicity do not affect how likely the general population is to choose that surgeon. However, the findings suggest more favorable perceptions of surgeons of the same racial/ethnic group, specifically among Caucasian American and Latinx raters.</p>
<p>”Combatting implicit bias is challenging, as these associations are subconscious and not necessarily ones that we can acknowledge as present.” Dr. Patel comments. “We need to look at new approaches to encourage patients to make decisions about plastic surgeons based on board certifications, qualifications, and experience – not on race or ethnicity.”</p>
<p><em><a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</a></em>® is published by <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/”>Wolters Kluwer</a>.</p>
<p><a href=”https://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/Fulltext/2021/06000/What_s_in_a_Name__Implicit_Bias_Affects_Patient.12.aspx” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Click here</a> to read “What’s in a Name? Implicit Bias Affects Patient Perception of Surgeon Skill”</p>
<p><small>Article: “What’s in a Name? Implicit Bias Affects Patient Perception of Surgeon Skill” (doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000008171)</small></p>
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<h2>
About Wolters Kluwer
</h2>

<p><a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Wolters Kluwer</a> (WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students in effective decision-making and outcomes across healthcare. We support clinical effectiveness, learning and research, clinical surveillance and compliance, as well as data solutions. For more information about our solutions, visit <a href=”https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health</a> and follow us on <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/wolters-kluwer/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>LinkedIn</a> and Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>@WKHealth</a>.</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>www.wolterskluwer.com</a>, follow us on <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Twitter</a>, <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/wolterskluwer” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>Facebook</a>, <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/wolters-kluwer/” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>LinkedIn</a> and <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/user/WoltersKluwerComms” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>YouTube</a>.</p>

</div> Wed, 26 May 2021 22:00:00 +0000 webmaster@plasticsurgery.org
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