ASPS Plastic Surgery Latest News






ASPS Plastic Surgery Latest News http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fftr.fivefilters.org%2Fmakefulltextfeed.php%3Furl%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fwww.plasticsurgery.org%252Frss%252Fnews-rss-feed%26max%3D5&max=5
The latest news from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons

How To Know If Your Teen Is Ready For Breast Reduction Surgery https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/how-to-know-if-your-teen-is-ready-for-breast-reduction-surgery
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<p>For many women, macromastia, or overly large breasts, is more than just an aesthetic issue – it’s also a health concern. Large breasts can cause discomfort and pain in the shoulders, neck and back. The medical condition can also cause rashes, interfere with physical activities and even cause upper extremity numbness, tingling and headaches. And these conditions are not unique to older women.</p>
<p>However, as the authors of a new study state in the December issue of <a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”><em>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</em></a>®, the official medical journal of the <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/”>American Society of Plastic Surgeons</a> (ASPS), some plastic surgeons remain hesitant to operate on adolescents. In the study, the authors present objective data exploring the relationship among overgrowth of breast tissue, body mass index (BMI) and age at first menses (first menstrual cycle) as a guide for patients and plastic surgeons for determining the appropriate timing for breast reduction surgery.</p>
<p>The major concern about breast reduction surgery on adolescents is that the patient’s breasts may continue to grow after surgery. This issue often leads primary care providers to delay the patient’s referral to a plastic surgeon until after the patient has reached chronological adulthood.</p>
<p>”Additionally, many third-party payors impose age restrictions when determining coverage for reduction mammaplasty without regard for the patient’s psychological and developmental maturity,” Brian Labow, MD, FACS, FAAP, of Boston Children’s Hospital, and coauthors write.</p>
<p>The optimal timing of breast reduction surgery – based on the biologic time point when breast growth stabilizes – varies significantly among patients, according to the new study, which included 481 adolescent girls and young women, aged 12 to 21, who underwent breast reduction surgery between 2007 and 2019.</p>
<p>Dr. Labow and colleagues analyzed a wide range of factors to predict the optimal timing, or biological “sweet spot,” to minimize the risk of breast regrowth after reduction mammaplasty.</p>
<p>Of the total study sample only six percent of patients had breast regrowth after surgery, and, in about half of those cases, breast regrowth resulted in a return of musculoskeletal symptoms, such as neck and back pain. Breast regrowth was due to additional growth of the breast gland in about 52 percent of cases, as opposed to weight gain in 48 percent.</p>
<p>Body weight had a significant impact on maturation and breast development. Girls who were overweight or obese were younger at the time of their first menstrual period compared to healthy-weight patients. Even after controlling for BMI, patients with earlier menstrual cycles had more severe breast enlargement.</p>
<p>Average age at breast reduction surgery was about 18 years, or six years after the first menstrual period – somewhat younger in obese patients. The obesity-related association between younger age at first menstrual period and more severe breast enlargement remained significant for up to nine years after menarche, or the first occurrence of menstruation.</p>
<p>In obese patients, performing breast reduction earlier than nine years after the first menstrual period was linked to a 20 percent increase in the likelihood of glandular breast regrowth. In non-obese women, the risk of breast regrowth was relatively low, as long as surgery was performed at least three years after the first menstrual period.</p>
<p>The study is the first to develop a “patient-centric” method for assessing breast size stability in adolescents seeking breast reduction. “Three years after the first menstrual period is commonly regarded as the end of puberty, and our study suggests that figure is about right for normal-weight adolescents,” Dr. Labow comments. “In contrast, for obese adolescents, breast size does not appear to stabilize until nine years after menarche.”</p>
<p>The findings suggest some special considerations for breast reduction in obese adolescents. “Although obese patients’ breast size may take longer to stabilize than their healthy-weighted peers, they may present for surgery at an earlier age due to undergoing puberty earlier and having greater breast hypertrophy,” the researchers write. They add it is “plausible” that increased body fat may have hormonal effects that not only result in early puberty but also lead to prolonged breast development.</p>
<p>Dr. Labow and colleagues emphasize that decisions about when to perform reduction mammaplasty should not be based on arbitrary age limits. They conclude: “Instead, surgical readiness is a complex decision that should be made by the surgeon on an individual basis incorporating the patient’s biological and psychological maturity, obesity status, potential for postoperative benefit and risk tolerance for postoperative breast regrowth.”</p>
<p><em><a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</a></em>® is published by <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/”>Wolters Kluwer</a>.</p>
<p><a href=”https://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/Fulltext/2020/12000/Optimal_Timing_for_Reduction_Mammaplasty_in.1.aspx” target=”_blank”>Click here</a> to read “Optimal Timing for Reduction Mammaplasty in Adolescents”</p>
<p><small>Article: “Optimal Timing for Reduction Mammaplasty in Adolescents” (doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000007325)</small></p>
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<h2>
About Wolters Kluwer
</h2>

<p><a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>Wolters Kluwer</a>&nbsp;(WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit <a href=”https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health” title=”Wolters Kluwer Health” target=”_blank”>https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health</a> and follow us on <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a> and Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>@WKHealth</a>.</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>www.wolterskluwer.com</a>, follow us&nbsp; on&nbsp;<a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>Twitter</a>, <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/wolterskluwer” target=”_blank”>Facebook</a>, <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a>, and <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/user/WoltersKluwerComms” target=”_blank”>YouTube</a>.</p>

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Bone Growth After Pediatric Hand Transplant Is Major Milestone in Reconstructive Surgery https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/bone-growth-after-pediatric-hand-transplant-is-major-milestone-in-reconstructive-surgery
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<p>In 2015, reconstructive plastic surgeons at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia faced a daunting challenge. Their patient was a young boy who suffered the amputation of both hands as a result of life-threatening sepsis. There was also another complicating factor: the same infection had led to the loss of both kidneys, necessitating a kidney transplant.</p>
<p>With that challenge came a unique opportunity. The patient was already taking immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection of his kidney transplant – opening the possibility of double hand transplantation to restore form and function. It would be the first procedure of its kind, and it raised a critical question: Would the transplanted hands grow along with the recipient?</p>
<p>According to a four-year follow-up study by Benjamin Chang, MD, and colleagues at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania, the transplanted hands grew at essentially the same rate as expected in a healthy child. “The results show that hand transplantation can be an option for reconstruction and rehabilitation in growing children,” Dr. Chang commented. The study appears in the December issue of <a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”><em>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</em></a>®, the official medical journal of the <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/”>American Society of Plastic Surgeons</a> (ASPS).</p>
<p>The procedure was the first bilateral (both sides) pediatric hand/forearm transplant procedure performed in a young child. The groundbreaking procedure was successful: one year later, with intensive follow-up and therapy, the patient’s new hands were functioning well.</p>
<p>In the new study, Dr. Chang and colleagues took an in-depth look at how the transplanted tissues grew in the years after surgery. Using follow-up x-rays, they performed detailed calculations to assess bone growth and skeletal maturation, compared to “normative” growth rates in healthy children.</p>
<p>The results showed steady growth of the forearm bones (radius and ulna): between nine and ten millimeters (mm) per year. Bone age – a standard assessment of skeletal maturation – increased by one year at each follow-up visit, just as expected in a healthy child. Growth rates were similar for both transplanted hands.</p>
<p>The patterns were consistent with data on normal growth. Total growth of the transplanted bones was 37.7 mm – not significantly different from the expected bone growth of 35.5 mm in healthy children.</p>
<p>An inch and a half of bone growth over four years may not seem like a big deal. However, it’s a meaningful step forward in the potential use of hand transplantation in children. The study provides the first long-term follow-up after hand transplantation during a period of rapid bone growth, in a child who lost his hands during “a critical window of fine motor development.”</p>
<p>While bone growth is a significant achievement, Dr. Chang also notes that the patient “is now able to use his hands for playing video games, writing, scaling a rock-climbing wall and, most importantly, using the bathroom by himself.”</p>
<p>Hand transplantation is a type of procedure called vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA). That term refers to transplants combining different types of tissues, such as skin, muscle, blood vessels, nerves and bone. Facial transplantation is another type of VCA.</p>
<p>In addition to successful restoration of hand function for the young transplant recipient, the study “celebrates another major milestone in reconstructive surgery,” Dr. Chang and colleagues conclude. “Although pediatric upper extremity VCA has not yet been widely adopted, our follow-up suggests that it may offer the advantage of growth rates similar to established non-transplant norms.”</p>
<p><em><a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</a></em>® is published by <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/”>Wolters Kluwer</a>.</p>
<p><a href=”https://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/Fulltext/2020/12000/Four_Year_Follow_Up_of_the_World_s_First_Pediatric.19.aspx” target=”_blank”>Click here</a> to read “Four-Year Follow-Up of the World’s First Pediatric Bilateral Hand-Forearm Transplants: Do They Grow as Expected?”</p>
<p><small>Article: “Four-Year Follow-Up of the World’s First Pediatric Bilateral Hand-Forearm Transplants: Do They Grow as Expected?” (doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000007338)</small></p>
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<h2>
About Wolters Kluwer
</h2>

<p><a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>Wolters Kluwer</a>&nbsp;(WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit <a href=”https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health” title=”Wolters Kluwer Health” target=”_blank”>https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health</a> and follow us on <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a> and Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>@WKHealth</a>.</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>www.wolterskluwer.com</a>, follow us&nbsp; on&nbsp;<a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>Twitter</a>, <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/wolterskluwer” target=”_blank”>Facebook</a>, <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a>, and <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/user/WoltersKluwerComms” target=”_blank”>YouTube</a>.</p>

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Why a “Board-Certified Cosmetic Surgeon” Isn’t a Plastic Surgeon, and What That Means for You https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/press-releases/why-a-board-certified-cosmetic-surgeon-isnt-a-plastic-surgeon-and-what-that-means-for-you
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<p>Cosmetic surgery – that’s just another way of saying plastic surgery, right? Wrong. Doctors who advertise themselves as certified by the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery (ABCS) don’t measure up to meet the criteria required for board-certified plastic surgeons.</p>
<p>In a study published in the November issue of <a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”><em>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</em></a>®, the official medical journal of the <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/”>American Society of Plastic Surgeons</a> (ASPS), Brian C. Drolet, MD, of Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues reviewed online information to assess residency training history and advertised scope of practice for 342 ABCS-certified physicians. “Our review of ABCS diplomate training backgrounds revealed nearly ten percent of ABCS members were not even trained in a surgical discipline,” the researchers write.</p>
<p>According to the study, over half (62.6%) of ABCS diplomates advertised surgical operations beyond the scope of their ACGME or CODA residency training. Specialties with the highest prevalence of practicing beyond scope of training were internal medicine (n=2, 100%), general surgery (n=69, 95.8%), obstetrics and gynecology (n=17, 85%), otolaryngology (n=65, 59.1%), dermatology (n=16, 51.6%) and oral and maxillofacial surgery (n=30, 50%).</p>
<p>The most commonly offered out of training scope procedures were liposuction (59.6%), abdominoplasty (50.0%), breast augmentation (49.7%) and buttock augmentation (36.5%).</p>
<table class=”table table-striped”>
<thead readability=”1″>
<tr readability=”3″>
<td>
<p>Specialty</p>
</td>
<td readability=”5″>
<p>Procedures considered “out of scope”</p>
</td>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody readability=”7″>
<tr readability=”9.5″>
<td>
<p>Otolaryngology</p>
</td>
<td readability=”10″>
<p>Aesthetic surgery below the neck</p>
<p>(e.g. breast augmentation, abdominal liposuction, abdominoplasty, buttock augmentation)</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr readability=”7″>
<td>
<p>Ophthalmology</p>
</td>
<td readability=”9″>
<p>Aesthetic surgery outside of periorbital region</p>
<p>(e.g. rhinoplasty, full facelift, neck lift)</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>
<p>OB/GYN</p>
</td>
<td>
<p>Any aesthetic surgery</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>
<p>General Surgery</p>
</td>
<td>
<p>Any aesthetic surgery</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr readability=”3″>
<td>
<p>Dermatology</p>
</td>
<td readability=”5″>
<p>Surgical procedures not including Mohs surgery or skin lesion</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr readability=”3″>
<td>
<p>OMFS</p>
</td>
<td readability=”5″>
<p>Any aesthetic surgery below the neck</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>
<p>Internal Medicine</p>
</td>
<td>
<p>Any surgical procedure</p>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>”When selecting an aesthetic surgeon, many patients place trust in knowing their surgeon is a ‘board-certified’ plastic surgeon,” Dr. Drolet and coauthors write. “Many patients falsely assume all surgeons must be board-certified in plastic surgery in order to perform cosmetic procedures.”</p>
<p>As the authors write, the unregulated growth of the aesthetic marketplace may make it difficult for patients to find a qualified cosmetic surgeon. Misleading marketing and overtly false advertising are widespread in many large markets. One metric commonly used to select a qualified surgeon is board-certification; however, that distinction has become obfuscated, blurring the lines for patients.</p>
<p>A board-certified plastic surgeon must have at least six years of surgical training, including completion of an accredited plastic surgery training program. They must perform thousands of cosmetic and reconstructive surgery procedures of different types, pass rigorous written and oral examinations and commit to continuing education and assessment throughout their careers.</p>
<p>However, an ABCS-diplomat is asked to complete only one year of surgical training, experience 300 procedures and one written and oral examination completed during a single weekend, with no continuing medical education requirements.</p>
<p>These differences are so pronounced that in 2018 the Medical Board of California concluded ABCS certification is not equivalent to ABMS Board Certification, and that <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/for-medical-professionals/publications/psn-extra/news/american-board-of-cosmetic-surgery-denied-right-to-advertise-as-board-certified-in-california”>ABCS diplomates cannot advertise themselves as “board-certified</a>.”</p>
<p>The high demand for cosmetic surgery – 1.8 million procedures performed in 2019, according to <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/documents/News/Statistics/2019/plastic-surgery-statistics-full-report-2019.pdf” target=”_blank”>ASPS statistics</a> – underscores the need for regulation and education to help patients make informed decisions. ASPS offers patients tips on how to select a <a href=”https://www.plasticsurgery.org/patient-safety”>board-certified plastic surgeon</a>.</p>
<p><em><a href=”http://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/pages/default.aspx”>Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery</a></em>® is published by <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/”>Wolters Kluwer</a>.</p>
<p><a href=”https://journals.lww.com/plasreconsurg/Fulltext/2020/11000/Board_Certification_in_Cosmetic_Surgery__An.16.aspx” target=”_blank”>Click here</a> to read “Board Certification in Cosmetic Surgery: An Evaluation of Training Backgrounds and Scope of Practice”</p>
<p><small>Article: “Board Certification in Cosmetic Surgery: An Evaluation of Training Backgrounds and Scope of Practice” (doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000007242)</small></p>
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<h2>
About Wolters Kluwer
</h2>

<p><a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>Wolters Kluwer</a>&nbsp;(WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.</p>
<p>Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit <a href=”https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health” title=”Wolters Kluwer Health” target=”_blank”>https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health</a> and follow us on <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a> and Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>@WKHealth</a>.</p>
<p>For more information, visit <a href=”http://www.wolterskluwer.com/” target=”_blank”>www.wolterskluwer.com</a>, follow us&nbsp; on&nbsp;<a href=”https://twitter.com/Wolters_Kluwer” target=”_blank”>Twitter</a>, <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/wolterskluwer” target=”_blank”>Facebook</a>, <a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/company/2483?trk=tyah&amp;trkInfo=tarId%3A1415118411059%2Ctas%3Awolters%20kluwer%2Cidx%3A2-1-6″ target=”_blank”>LinkedIn</a>, and <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/user/WoltersKluwerComms” target=”_blank”>YouTube</a>.</p>

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